“Ant-Man and The Wasp” stars Paul Rudd (Anchorman, Clueless) and Evangeline Lily (The Hurt Locker, The Hobbit) and takes place in the time between Captain
America: Civil War and Avengers: Infinity War. Paul Rudd’s character Scott Lang and Evangeline Lily’s character Hope team up to help rescue the original wasp: Hope’s mother.

The story focuses on the marginal characters of the Marvel Cinematic Universe and the smaller scale events of these heroes’ lives. Scott is on house arrest and trying to maintain a relationship with his daughter. Hope is still working as a quantum assistant to her father Hank Pym, the original Ant-Man.

The first half of the movie is slow and includes a lot of dialogue for a comic book movie. The set-up of conversational exposition works to serve the plot later on in the story and performs its task well enough. It is certainly a more evenly paced movie than Avengers: Infinity War and includes the typical Marvel movie humor.

The interspersed action scenes, when they happen, are entertaining and are what one can expect from the typical comic book movie. Most comic book storylines tend to not delve too deeply into philosophical explorations of the human experience. They function more superficially as a kind of dime store entertainment, consuming enough to pass the time and the cinematic superhero genre with a few exceptions has followed suit, as does Ant-Man and The Wasp.

The violence is empty. The convictions are non-existent. The reasons for fighting are paper thin and the duality of good and evil is as simply constructed and presented as the toys (PEZ dispenser, HotWheels Cars) the movie uses for humor.

Although “Ant-Man and The Wasp” is not a departure from the stock formula of most Marvel movies, it has moments of fun that make it a forgettable, but enjoyable, mindless summer movie.

Article Written By Nick Murillo
eParisExtra.com Movie Reviewer

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